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This masterpiece of Leonardo da Vinci emerged before my mind’s eye and then just ran me into a corner (figuratively speaking). So I was sitting in the corner of the dorm and cudgeling my head trying to recall the name of the painting. It wasn’t the “young lady” part I was after, but that little beast on her lap. What was the name of it? A young lady with a weasel? No, too ugly. A young lady with a ferret? Maybe, but... If I would be living in a free world, I’ll google the image and be done, but there is no web in prison. I kept calling candidate beasts until I have caught “ermine”. I think it is ermine and I only hope that from now on this ermine will sit still in my sloppy memory next to the painting.
Next day I had to watch Clooney’s Monument Men, I haven’t seen it before. The movie was a salad of an incredible cast rutted into a choppy script. I probably would sit this one out, if not for Cate Blanchett and her stratospheric play. So, in the very end Stokes (Clooney’s character) shows slides of masterpieces recovered from Nazis and, oh my God — here she comes, in color! And then again, she appeared during credits, now in black and white, on a photo which looked like an original piece of evidence. So she was recovered from the Nazis, indeed. For me this young lady with her little pet looks as good asMrs. Giaconda.

That’s an example of a cognitive echo, that is running into an object of your intense thought twice (or thrice) within some twenty odd hours. My bunkie says that this is an experience which makes all the difference between being alive and dead (although still alive physically), he calls it synchronicity. That’s a flattering thought and a questionable term, although none bears an explanation. My take on it is this: the cognitive echo is a glitch in a matrix of our so-called reality. Yes, the reality is affected by an intense thought. After all, everything we perceive in this world, including the measurements of most objective devices, comes to us through our senses, and this part is the one that is rigged. I call it cognitive echo because unlike its acoustic namesake, it can be registered only through the faculty of your mind. One may invoke probability to explain such effects, but the probability is what makes such effects highly improbable. Cognitive echo gives the devil of solipsism its due, but it is not solipsism. If your prayers have ever been answered, then you know what I am talking about. Another example of cognitive echo is Mandela effect. I’ve been through such experiences for dozens of times. How about you?

An exhibition opens today in London offering art lovers an extraordinary insight into the methodology behind the man who epitomizes the beauty and soul of  Renaissance art

Hailed as one of the greatest painters ever to have graced the art world, Leonardo da Vinci's work is renowned, with his most famous pieces including the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper.

The amazing exhibition will offer a chance to see the greatest collection of his masterpieces ever assembled — 60 drawings and paintings by him, as well as paintings by his school.

Bela Abel
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COGNITIVE ECHO II OR HUMMINGBIRD This event had happened just two days ago: H. came to me and asked if I have any photos of hummingbirds. He needed it for a painting which he was commissioned to do and he wanted to see a photo for the right colors. I’ve looked through the high-resolution cache I have, but the nearest bird I could find was a bird of paradise. 
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LILACS OUT OF DULL BRAIN or COGNITIVE ECHO III 
I’ve lost a word.  And this was so embarrassing – I’ve lost a pretty common word, not an opisthoproct or cosidoron (those are coming wherever I need them).  It was a good word, a name of that pretty common shrub with purple or white clusters of flowers.  You know what I am talking about? 
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ARCHIMEDES AND KIRCHNER or COGNITIVE ECHO IV
Cognitive Echo is one of the original and most interesting phenomena which we have discussed.  We discussed it through various physical manifestations which occur quite regularly in our lives, but cognitive echo can happen sometimes in quite subtle ways...
 


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