It would be an awful folly to consider God as a dweller of the same time-space domain where we are presently living. Some of us still believe in naive cliché of a gray-bearded old man lolling on a cloud. Not that He can’t do it, but just as much as on a cloud, you should expect to find Him on the bottom of the ocean or on a tip of a solar flare. The point is:
Our so-called reality is mere a projection of REALITY [1]. This idea is not new, nor is it original–Plato in his Republic introduced the idea of perception of our reality as a shadow of a real reality falling on the wall of a dark cave

 
 
I had a little thought which turned into a big #meditation. I would like to share it with you. It is just an idea, an #idea as old as this world, I would be a total fool if I’ll claim of being original here. It is a dreadful idea, but I'll try to get some good vibes out of it, see if it will works for you as it worked for me. Here is:
Appearance and reality are two different twins which anyone can distinguish. Is that so? Let's see:
Sun appears as one going around the earth and not vice versa. That’s appearance vs. reality of motion. You can add more similar examples if you wish.


 
 
While I was working on my latest novel, The Leap of Faith”, I came to a notion, that appeared trite and mind-boggling at the same time. Maybe I've just never looked into it that way, I don't know, but the more I am thinking about it, the more amazing it appears. I'd like to share it with you.

Each of us, living man or woman, are the living tips of incredibly long lines of lives, going all the way down to the dawn of humanity. And if we could follow these lines back in time, we would arrive at the source, where all these lines converge. What is that source? Or who was it? Was it a single pair of progenitors, or a cluster of several different but capable of interbreeding species? The answer remains a matter of faith, religious or scientific, whichever you take.


 
 
The day of Transfiguration had just passed. It was a good day to be on some mountain, looking up for a light. I couldn’t do it, though; I've spent my day in a hole, in darkness. Nevertheless, it never hurts to dream about light:
And why do we call it transfiguration? That's the question I’ve asked myself.
As the story went, Jesus took three of his best disciples (Peter, John, James), went to Mt. Hermon and there his countenance turned dazzling white; Moses and Elijah appeared before Him and paid Him homage; and Peter said... well, everyone knows the story [1].
You also probably know, that the Transfiguration of Jesus, like almost everything else in the New Testament, was preceded by Old Testament events - the transfiguration of Moses. Moses’ countenance irradiated bright light, when he went down from Mount Sinai. “The skin of his face shone because he had been speaking with the Lord.”[2].


 
 
“If only I had known what he would turn out to be,” said Henry Tandey, a British soldier of WWI, who had a chance to kill Adolph Hitler at the Battle of Marcoing.

According to Henry's account, he took aim but had a heart not to kill a wounded German soldier. “If I only had known what he would turn out to be. When I saw all the people, women and children he had killed and wounded, I was sorry to God to let him go.” [1]


 
 
I was patient and ignored all cognitive echoes which had happened to me since I’ve last time described this phenomenon in the Hummingbird.  Yet another echo had #happened and this time I have gave in.  Here is the story. 
I have lost a word.  And this was so embarrassing – I have lost a pretty common word, not an opisthoproct or cosidoron (those are coming wherever I need them).  It was a good word, a name of that pretty common shrub with purple or white clusters of flowers.  You know what I am talking about? 

 
 
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“How Splendid it would be, Agathon, if wisdom was the sort of thing that could flow from the fuller to emptier of us when we touch each other, like water, which flows through a piece of Wool from a fuller cup to an emptier one.” says Socrates inPlato's Symposium [1].
Let’s ignore for a moment the philosopher’s double-entendre which leaves no doubt in the context of the book, and look at the imagery of Socrates’s thought. 


 
 
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He had slightly reddish-brown hair reaching down to his shoulders and a long, wispy beard. It was his first beard and he sported it with dignity against all snide remarks of his peers. With this long hair, beard and at a height of 62 he carried an uncanny resemblance to you know who. He knew it. And so, to make this resemblance even stronger, he developed this innocently benevolent expression, a subtle smile half-hidden under facial hair, which he carried around like an icon impersonator.

 
 
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A great psychologist Carl Jung once Wrote:

We wholly overlook the essential fact that the achievements which society rewards
are won at the cost of diminution of personality. (C. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul)

I agree, we totally overlooked that. We also may expand this claim that people without personality are overachievers per se. But for the same reason they can’t be rewarded any further, so most of them must remain under the radar of public accolade. And, furthermore, when society imposes a punishment, and that can be viewed as a negative reward, the personality of a rewarded becomes notably enhanced commensurate to the time to be served and custody level.
What?

 
 
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I have already written about Mandela Effect.  I have more to say about this crazy universal phenomenon. I remember how I was introduced to it. A friend of mine asked me: “Do you remember what Bible says about the new wine?”
"Sure,” I said, “nobody pours new wine into old wineskins, because they will burst, but new wineskins must be used for new wine.”
“And you know what this means?”
“I do,” I said, “this was Jesus metaphor for the new teaching, which he brought to us as an upgrade of Old Testament.”